Provincialism at Large: Sukanya Banerjee 13/2/2020

We’re delighted to welcome Prof. Sukanya Banerjee for the first of our 2020 Provincialism at Large events. Prof. Banerjee (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), will be giving a masterclass and evening lecture as a joint event with Royal Holloway Centre for Victorian Studies.


Sukanya Banerjee is the author of Becoming Imperial Citizens: Indians in the Late-Victorian Empire (2010, awarded the NVSA Sonya Rudikoff Prize for best first book in Victorian Studies), and the co-editor of New Routes for Diaspora Studies (2012). Her articles have also appeared in journals such as Victorian Studies, Victorian Literature and Culture, and Diaspora: A Journal of Transnational Studies.

The masterclass is entitled ‘”Nation”, “Home” and “Empire” in Victorian Studies’, and will be taking place on Thursday 13th February at 2-3pm in Room IN029 (International Building, Egham campus). The talk will be taking place on the same day at 6-7.30pm in the Moore Annexe Lecture Theatre (Egham campus). 

Readings for the masterclass (pdfs below): Burton, A. (1997), Who Needs the Nation? Interrogating ‘British’ History. Journal of Historical Sociology, 10: 227-248. doi:10.1111/1467-6443.00039

Banerjee, Sukanya. “Transimperial.” Victorian Literature and Culture 46, no. 3-4 (2018): 925–28. doi:10.1017/S1060150318001195

Register for free tickets via Eventbrite: 

Masterclass: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/masterclass-nation-home-and-empire-in-victorian-studies-tickets-90520779087.

Evening talk: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/sukanya-banerjee-title-tbc-tickets-90521188311.

Lecture 6pm: Colonial Economies, Consumer Loyalty, and the Transimperial

Can the expansive demands of the free market be reconciled with more sedimented yearnings for the “local,” the “provincial”? In revisiting this classic-and abiding question-this talk studies the relation between late-nineteenth-century India and Britain, considering how an idiom of consumer loyalty negotiates the tense relation between free trade and incipient notions of territoriality and nationalism.

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